Past Research

Below are some of the past research projects of The Gerontology Institute. For a detailed list of all research projects, please contact us.

Principal Investigator: Jennifer Craft Morgan, Ph.D.
Project Description

North Carolina was one of six states chosen as a grantee to develop a Personal and Home Care Aide State Training Program (PHCAST) for direct care workers in long term care settings. The proposal was led by the NC Department of Health and Human Services and will be managed in collaboration with the NC Foundation for Advanced Health Programs.

Principal Investigator: Jennifer Craft Morgan, Ph.D.
Project Description

Evaluating Innovations in Nursing Education (EIN) is a national initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation that supports evaluations of interventions that expand teaching capacity or promote faculty recruitment and retention in schools of nursing.

For more information, please click here.
Principal Investigator: Byron G. Spencer (McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada)
Co-investigator: Candace Kemp (with others)
Project: SEDAP II - Canada in the 21st Century: Moving Towards an Older SocietyFunding Source: Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Major Collaborative Research InitiativeValue: $2,498,047
Principal Investigator: Lori D. Campbell (McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada)
Co-investigator: Candace Kemp (with Jenny Ploeg and Carolyn Rosenthal)Project: Exploring the Experience and Meaning of Inheritance Within FamiliesFunding Source: Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Standard Research Grants ProgramValue: $75,649
Principal Investigator: Julie A. McMullin (The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada)
Co-investigator: Candace Kemp (with others)

Project: Workforce Aging in the New Economy

Funding Source: Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Initiative in the New Economy

Value: $3,000,000

Sharon V. King is Co-investigator on a Georgia State University Team Research Grant .

Value: $15,000

Sharon V. King is Principal Investigator on this Georgia State University Women Faculty Mentoring Grant.

Value: $5,000

Sharon V. King is Principal Investigator on a Regional Community Health Grant from the Aetna Foundation.

Value: $48,000

Sharon V. King is Principal Investigator for Georgia State University Gerontology Institute.

Value: $1,000

Project Coordinator: Sharon King (Research Assistant Professor in Gerontology)

King held a project start-up training session with the Kenya partners in the target community of Kisumu during her March trip and visited one of the families who will participate in the activities.

After almost a year of planning, the G.E.N.O. (Grandparents Empowered to Nurture Orphans) pilot project, funded by the Coca-Cola Africa Foundation, is in the field in Uganda, Tanzania, and Kenya. Thanks to the cooperation of the project partners who met in Nairobi to launch the activities in March, 2007, 50 grandparents raising grandchildren orphaned by AIDS in each of the three countries will soon receive income-generating agricultural supplies and HIV/AIDS prevention training to pass on to the orphans in their care. They will participate in focus groups and individual interviews to discuss their experiences as grandparent caregivers affected by HIV/AIDS.

Globally, more than 13 million children under 18 years-11 million of them in sub Saharan Africa-have lost one or both parents to AIDS. Many children affected by HIV/AIDS live in households headed by a grandparent or other older family member. The overall goal of the G.E.N.O. project is to strengthen care and support for these orphans by providing their older caregivers the knowledge and resources they need in their new roles as heads of households with young children. The Coca-Cola grant is providing funds to train 100 grandparents in HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention and to organize parenting skills support groups. Poverty and poor nutrition have been directly linked with the spread of AIDS.

Principal Investigator: Mary Ball
Co-Investigators: Molly Perkins (Project Manager) and Frank Whittington (Gerontology Institute), Kirk Elifson and Robert Adelman (Sociology Department)

The Gerontology Institute has been awarded a 3-year grant to learn how assisted living facilities (ALFs) can create an environment that maximizes satisfaction and retention of direct care staff.

Results of this study will increase our understanding of the motivations, behaviors, incentives, and barriers to professionalization of paid care givers of older, frail persons residing in assisted living facilities. This understanding will help increase satisfaction and reduce direct-care staff shortages and turnover, thus enhancing quality of care and life of residents.

Thirty-six ALFs in Georgia will be selected to represent variation in 3 categories of facility size (16-25; 26-50; 51+ residents) and 3 areas of the state. Within these facilities, 308 direct-care staff will be selected randomly for face-to-face interviews. An additional 40 staff will be purposively selected for in-depth interviews.

These interviews will focus on staff members' experiences and attitudes toward caregiving and include a job satisfaction scale. One administrator from each home will also be interviewed to determine the facility's organizational structure and policies and procedures and the administrator's experiences and attitudes related to staffing. In addition, facility documents containing policies and procedures related to staffing will be reviewed.